Why Electrical Contractors Should Include Backup Power In Projects

By George Senzere, Solutions Architect, Secure Power at Schneider Electric

The South African power grid comes with unpredictability and sometimes volatility. And as we all know, a less reliable network results in more frequent outages, which directly impacts commercial and residential communities.

It is difficult to accomplish anything in the modern world without electricity. And with many organizations following a hybrid working model, backup power has become non-negotiable.

To this end, backup power supplies such as inverters should therefore be part of the proposals of electrical contractors when bidding on a business project or working on a residential contract.

Adding an inverter to your quote is relatively simple and you can do the installation yourself. If you need help planning and sizing the best UPS for the job, you can work with a reputable brand UPS distribution partner to select and offer the right option. For large installations, we work hand-in-hand with our channel partners to ensure your UPS installation is done correctly and to the highest standards.

Also, if an inverter is not requested in the project, you can recommend it as an additional value to add your electrical upgrade or installation points. Here are some important points that should be part of your proposal:

  • What is the short and long term financial impact on the business in the event of a power outage?
  • What would be the impact of an outage on the customer’s operations?
  • Do personal safety risks increase in the event of a power outage?
  • In the case of a high-end residential customer, how would they benefit from UPS for communications, surveillance, gaming, remote work and remote learning?
  • What is the capital cost of a production machine?

By providing UPS technology, you can extend the reach of your services through long-term contracts that also include UPS service and remote monitoring. Most of our large industrial UPSs have data capture and monitoring capabilities to optimize their condition and performance.

Additionally, you can provide monitoring services or contract a vendor, such as Schneider Electric, to monitor backup operations while maintaining contact with the customer. Essentially, as an electrical contractor, you can expand your services by moving into the managed service provider space and increase your business margins.

Installation and implementation follow-up, as well as maintenance services, will allow you to stay in touch with the customer in the long term. You can use these services as an entrepreneur differentiator, which is a big plus, ensuring you can foster a lasting and mutually beneficial relationship with your client.

Ultimately, by offering a backup solution such as UPS, you show initiative and foresight in protecting valuable assets and customer productivity environments.

Patricia D. Rutt